This material covers the difference between plannimetric and topographic maps, why an aerial photo is not a map, principles of stereoscopy, equipment for then mapping by Plane Table and from aerial photography and many related topics as detailed below.  

 

 

Chapter

 

A

Stereoscopy

B

Plannimetric and Topographic Maps, Photo versus Map

C

Plane Tabling earliest form of map making

D

Use of Slotted Template Equipment GHQ Middle East 1942

Source, Unknown as extracted from historical photocopies

 

 

1

Cameras and Lenses

3

Stereotopographic Mapping

5

Displacement due to Topographic Relief and Tilt

6

Measuring and Plotting Instruments

7

Control

10

Analytical Solution of the Problem of Topographic Mapping

12

Map Reproduction

Sharp, Howard Oakley (1943), Photogrammetry, 3rd Edn., John Wiley & Sons, Inc

 

 

1

Introduction to Maps and Air Photographs

3

Properties of Pairs of Photographs

4

Flying for Cover

5

Radial Line Methods of Increasing Control

6

Measuring Heights and Contouring

7

Plotting of Detail, Mosaics

8

Map and Plan Reproduction

9

Characteristics of Film and Camera

11

An Introduction to Machine Plotting

12

Some More Instruments

Kilford, WK (1970), Elementary Air Survey, 2nd Edn., Pitman, Australia.